Quit complaining and get back to work

As I may have mentioned (pretty much in EVERY post) I’m currently editing my YA novel CRAVING.

Editing a book is often a time of much doom for writers, especially ones who tend to be overly critical of their own work, and I certainly fall under that category. For the past week I’ve sent a stream of neurotic emails to my (very patient) writer buddy, worrying about my book and whether the writing’s tight enough, the story is engaging enough, the characters are – well, you get the point!

To help me through this time of anxiety and doubt, she sent me this wonderful article by Elizabeth Gilbert, author of ‘Eat, Pray, Love’, which I found very inspirational, so thought I’d repost it and pay it forward.

The article:

When I was writing “Eat, Pray, Love”, I had just as a strong a mantra of THIS SUCKS ringing through my head as anyone does when they write anything. But I had a clarion moment of truth during the process of that book. One day, when I was agonizing over how utterly bad my writing felt, I realized: “That’s actually not my problem.” The point I realized was this – I never promised the universe that I would write brilliantly; I only promised the universe that I would write. So I put my head down and sweated through it, as per my vows.

I have a friend who’s an Italian filmmaker of great artistic sensibility. After years of struggling to get his films made, he sent an anguished letter to his hero, the brilliant (and perhaps half-insane) German filmmaker Werner Herzog. My friend complained about how difficult it is these days to be an independent filmmaker, how hard it is to find government arts grants, how the audiences have all been ruined by Hollywood and how the world has lost its taste…etc, etc. Herzog wrote back a personal letter to my friend that essentially ran along these lines:

“Quit your complaining. It’s not the world’s fault that you wanted to be an artist. It’s not the world’s job to enjoy the films you make, and it’s certainly not the world’s obligation to pay for your dreams. Nobody wants to hear it. Steal a camera if you have to, but stop whining and get back to work.”

I repeat those words back to myself whenever I start to feel resentful, entitled, competitive or unappreciated with regard to my writing: “It’s not the world’s fault that you want to be an artist…now get back to work.” 

Always, at the end of the day, the important thing is only and always that: Get back to work. This is a path for the courageous and the faithful. You must find another reason to work, other than the desire for success or recognition. It must come from another place.

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